On February 16, 2018, Coinbase admitted that some customers were overcharged in error for credit and debit purchases of cryptocurrencies. The problem was initiated when banks and card issuers changed the merchant category code (MCC) for cryptocurrency purchases earlier this month. This meant that cryptocurrency payments would now be processed as "cash advances", meaning that banks and credit card issuers could begin charging customers cash-advance fees for cryptocurrency purchases. Any customers who purchased cryptocurrency on their exchange between January 22 and February 11, 2018 could have been affected. At first, Visa blamed Coinbase, telling the Financial Times on February 16 that it had "not made any systems changes that would result in the duplicate transactions cardholders are reporting." However, the latest statement from Visa and Worldpay on the Coinbase blog clarifies: "This issue was not caused by Coinbase."[45]
The platform stores 98% of customers funds offline to ensure the security of the cryptocurrency assets you purchase and store within Coinbase. On their website, Coinbase assures customers that "sensitive data that would normally reside on our servers is disconnected entirely from the internet." Data is then encrypted, and transferred to USB drives and paper backups, and distributed in safe deposit boxes vaults all over the world. 

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